Inclusivity and Diversity


One of Resolve Conservation and Natural Matriarch's core commitments is to create a diverse and inclusive environment. As both a service provider and employer, we not only want people to be comfortable being themselves, but also to be celebrated for their identities and what makes them unique. In addition, we try to build a culture where we don’t make assumptions or pass judgment on each other regardless of race, color, religion, national origin, age, gender, sex, ancestry, citizenship status, formal education level, first language spoken, mental or physical disability, genetic information, sexual orientation, veteran status, or military status. And as equal opportunity employers, we do not discriminate against any employee or applicant for employment based on race, color, religion, national origin, age, gender, sex, ancestry, citizenship status, formal education level, first language spoken, mental or physical disability, genetic information, sexual orientation, veteran status, or military status

We will not operate in a system where we assume things about each other based on how we look and sound.  An increasingly common and seemingly simple way to address this is to use preferred gender pronouns.

So what are these Gender Pronouns I keep hearing about?

Pronouns are used in language all the time when we refer to ourselves or other people. Examples of pronouns you might use refer to others are:
 - he/him/his (for someone who might identify as male),
 - she/her/hers (for someone who might identify as female),
 - they/them/their (for someone who might not identify strictly as male or female, these pronouns are considered ‘gender neutral’; also used when referring to multiple people).

If someone feels the need to state their pronouns, does it mean they are transgender and/or gender non-conforming?

Nope.  Everyone has a gender identity, and most of us have specific pronouns we use when we are being referred to. Some might ask: Isn’t it typically obvious what pronouns to use for a person? (For instance, if someone has a ‘female’ name and looks ‘female,’ then can’t one assume that person identifies as female and would want to be referred to with she/her/hers pronouns?) To answer that question, yes, most of us are privileged in that when someone guesses our pronouns, they’ll get them right. However, that’s not the case for everyone. Oftentimes this might be because a person is gender non-conforming (where they don’t clearly conform to ‘traditional’ male or female standards) or are openly transgender (which might also leave some unsure which pronouns to use). With that said, if someone decides to tell you their pronouns, it does not automatically mean they are transgender or gender non-conforming.

And... although it is our goal to be inclusive, to embrace diversity, and to acknowledge our personal privileges, we are still learning.  If you would like to share an experience or thought with us, we will hold space for you.  You can contact us anytime at connect@resolveconservation.com